Thats just life. control a bit out of control to the rest.
~ Thursday, August 14 ~
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COCKATOO ISLAND: A GRAPHIC CARTOGRAPHY: DEAD (PAN)

cloudzwatching:

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Cockatoo Island: A Graphic Cartography: Dead (Pan) – Peng Hu & Shieyee Tham

Urban Islands, Sydney, Australia (Jimenez Lai & Joanna Grant)



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emt-monster:

The beautiful brain. Sagittal, coronal and horisontal view.


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superarchitects:

NON_SEQUITUR: A Neighbourhood

Anthony Morey / B.Arch / Southern California Institute of Architecture / Los Angeles, US / Advisors: Dwayne Oyler, Thom Mayne / August 2014

The Surrealist, early in the 1900’s, found themselves ready to clear the table, finding artist leisure in the process. They wanted nothing more than to create, flourish, but they understood that the tools at hand were not ready, not open to such a process, such an idea. They were limited by the current. They saw, that for the moment, the goal should not be to build, but to destroy, in order to one day rebuild. They needed to show the weakness, the choices, the ideas that were being lost, hidden in the shadows. Of course the political connections are more than plentiful, but their approach, their willingness to question, their mastery of the craft in order to know how to/ and where to experiment is the true power of the surrealist thought.

Series of Plans and Sections // Series one takes on the qualities of Plan and Section. There is an immediate knowable quality to the drawings, grasp-ability. Focusing on the tools that allow for such constant common readings to occur. Classic tools were at use, poshe, gestalt, hard lines, flattening of shapes, interior, elevation, proximity, movement. Allowing for the signifiers of plan and section to be called into question, allowing these to themselves allow for new associations, ones only possible when teased in the mind. There is no stair, elevator, steel column detail, and there shouldn’t be. Calling attention to moments, implying movement, not direction. Showing volume, but no scale. All these were understood to their fundamentals and then turned to cast doubt on themselves. Allowing for choice in the reading, unraveling.

(Source: super-architects.com)


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~ Friday, August 1 ~
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experimentsinmotion:

After the Apocalypse: High Art in a Dark Future

In their “Apocalypse in Art" series, Ukrainian artists Vitaliy and Elena Vasilieva envision the world’s current citadels of art under siege. In a future desolated by environmental disaster, the familiar forms of our cultural landmarks stand out in sharp relief: the New Museum's stacked blocks in a flooded landscape, the Guggenheim's helical galleries nestled among the sand dunes, and the Pompidou Center's exposed infrastructure lit up in a lightning storm. By placing cultural landmarks in imagined post-apocalyptic world, the artists raise questions about the longevity and role of art and the relationship between environment and our cultural artifacts. Even in an apocalyptic future, art lives on, a testament to the power of cultural creation. Indeed, the series suggests that if culture is harnessed to transform how we view and treat the environment, such an end might be averted.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)


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~ Thursday, July 24 ~
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ryanpanos:

Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via

The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.

The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.


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hateplow:

THE SUM OF HALFWAYS


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